College Bridge researches, develops, implements, and evaluates programs to increase college access and success for underrepresented students.


Projects
uniAcademic Preparation

College Bridge works collaboratively with our K-12 and higher education partners to create innovative academic programs designed to ensure that under-represented students graduate from high school college-ready. Our flagship programs, the SLAM and LA Bridge Projects, are dual-enrollment math and English programs where college professors and high school teachers co-teach college-level coursework to under-represented high school seniors.

capCollege Knowledge

Given that the average high school counselor to student ratio in California’s public schools is 1,061:1, College Bridge strives to bring much needed college counseling services to under-represented students and their families. Since the need is so great, we partner with local university outreach programs and community based organizations that offer these services so our overall impact is amplified.


Impact

Demonstrated College Readiness in Math

College Access for Underrepresented Students

  College Persistence      Year 1 to Year 2

  College Persistence      Year 2 to Year 3


Testimonials
  • The program you have developed is instrumental in curbing the high remediation rates, in both mathematics and English, that hinder our students' ability to persist through college graduation. –Dr. William Covino President of Cal State LA

  • The SLAM Project, and the upcoming South Los Angeles English Bridge Project, are great examples of what can be accomplished through nonprofit partnerships. –Eric Garcetti Mayor of Los Angeles

  • As State Superintendent of Public Instruction, I am working to make college more affordable and accessible for California students. By helping 76 percent of your students earn college credit for free while still in high school, the Los Angeles Bridge Program has been critical to expediting students’ path to earning a degree and lowering their post-secondary expenses. –Tom Torlakson,State Superintendent of Public Instruction